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#1 » by eMade (f) Premium (β40576) » March 24th, 2019, 12:17 pm

#WorldTuberculosisDay: Despite the advancement in medicine, Tuberculosis still remains a deadly killer. It takes over 4,500 lives daily.
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The World Tuberculosis Day today 24th March creates another opportunity to spread the message and awareness far and wide.
World Tuberculosis Day, observed on 24 March each year, is designed to build public awareness about the global epidemic of tuberculosis and efforts to eliminate the disease.

The theme of World TB Day 2019 - ‘It’s time’ – puts the accent on the urgency to act on the commitments made by global leaders to:

scale up access to prevention and treatment;

build accountability;

ensure sufficient and sustainable financing including for research;

promote an end to stigma and discrimination, and

promote an equitable, rights-based and people-centered TB response.


The World Health Organization (WHO) has launched a joint initiative “Find. Treat. All. #EndTB” with the Global Fund and Stop TB Partnership, with the aim of accelerating the TB response and ensuring access to care, in line with WHO’s overall drive towards Universal Health Coverage.

This World TB Day, WHO calls on governments, affected communities, civil society organizations, health-care providers, and national/international partners to unite forces under the banner “Find. Treat. All. #EndTB” to ensure no one is left behind.

It’s time for action! It’s time to End TB.

https://www.who.int/campaigns/world-tb- ... b-day-2019

Learn more today. Get tested. Protect yourself and your loved ones.

Briefly about TB:
Key facts

Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the top 10 causes of death worldwide.
In 2017, 10 million people fell ill with TB, and 1.6 million died from the disease (including 0.3 million among people with HIV).
In 2017, an estimated 1 million children became ill with TB and 230 000 children died of TB (including children with HIV associated TB).
TB is a leading killer of HIV-positive people.
Multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) remains a public health crisis and a health security threat. WHO estimates that there were 558 000 new cases with resistance to rifampicin – the most effective first-line drug, of which - 82% had MDR-TB.
Globally, TB incidence is falling at about 2% per year. This needs to accelerate to a 4–5% annual decline to reach the 2020 milestones of the End TB Strategy.
An estimated 54 million lives were saved through TB diagnosis and treatment between 2000 and 2017.
Ending the TB epidemic by 2030 is among the health targets of the Sustainable Development Goals.
Tuberculosis (TB) is caused by bacteria (Mycobacterium tuberculosis) that most often affect the lungs. Tuberculosis is curable and preventable.

TB is spread from person to person through the air. When people with lung TB cough, sneeze or spit, they propel the TB germs into the air. A person needs to inhale only a few of these germs to become infected.

About one-quarter of the world's population has latent TB, which means people have been infected by TB bacteria but are not (yet) ill with the disease and cannot transmit the disease.

People infected with TB bacteria have a 5–15% lifetime risk of falling ill with TB. However, persons with compromised immune systems, such as people living with HIV, malnutrition or diabetes, or people who use tobacco, have a much higher risk of falling ill.

When a person develops active TB disease, the symptoms (such as cough, fever, night sweats, or weight loss) may be mild for many months. This can lead to delays in seeking care, and results in transmission of the bacteria to others. People with active TB can infect 10–15 other people through close contact over the course of a year. Without proper treatment, 45% of HIV-negative people with TB on average and nearly all HIV-positive people with TB will die.

Who is most at risk?

Tuberculosis mostly affects adults in their most productive years. However, all age groups are at risk. Over 95% of cases and deaths are in developing countries.

People who are infected with HIV are 20 to 30 times more likely to develop active TB (see TB and HIV section below). The risk of active TB is also greater in persons suffering from other conditions that impair the immune system.

One million children (0–14 years of age) fell ill with TB, and 230 000 children (including children with HIV associated TB) died from the disease in 2017.

Tobacco use greatly increases the risk of TB disease and death. 7.9% of TB cases worldwide are attributable to smoking.

Global impact of TB

TB occurs in every part of the world. In 2017, the largest number of new TB cases occurred in the South-East Asia and Western Pacific regions, with 62% of new cases, followed by the African region, with 25% of new cases.

In 2017, 87% of new TB cases occurred in the 30 high TB burden countries. Eight countries accounted for two thirds of the new TB cases: India,China,Indonesia, the Philippines, Pakistan, Nigeria, Bangladesh and South Africa.

Symptoms and diagnosis

Common symptoms of active lung TB are cough with sputum and blood at times, chest pains, weakness, weight loss, fever and night sweats. Many countries still rely on a long-used method called sputum smear microscopy to diagnose TB. Trained laboratory technicians look at sputum samples under a microscope to see if TB bacteria are present. Microscopy detects only half the number of TB cases and cannot detect drug-resistance.

The use of the rapid test Xpert MTB/RIF® has expanded substantially since 2010, when WHO first recommended its use. The test simultaneously detects TB and resistance to rifampicin, the most important TB medicine. Diagnosis can be made within 2 hours and the test is now recommended by WHO as the initial diagnostic test in all persons with signs and symptoms of TB.

Diagnosing multi-drug resistant and extensively drug-resistant TB (see Multidrug-resistant TB section below) as well as HIV-associated TB can be complex and expensive. In 2016, 4 new diagnostic tests were recommended by WHO – a rapid molecular test to detect TB at peripheral health centres where Xpert MTB/RIF cannot be used, and 3 tests to detect resistance to first- and second-line TB medicines.

Tuberculosis is particularly difficult to diagnose in children and as yet only the Xpert MTB/RIF assay is generally available to assist with the diagnosis of paediatric TB.

Treatment

TB is a treatable and curable disease. Active, drug-susceptible TB disease is treated with a standard 6 month course of 4 antimicrobial drugs that are provided with information, supervision and support to the patient by a health worker or trained volunteer. Without such support, treatment adherence can be difficult and the disease can spread. The vast majority of TB cases can be cured when medicines are provided and taken properly.

Between 2000 and 2017, an estimated 54 million lives were saved through TB diagnosis and treatment.

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#2 » by AK Horsfall Premium (β35385) » March 24th, 2019, 12:25 pm

Some few days ago we had World Down syndrome day, World Happiness day, World Water day and now World Tuberculosis day. I think the month of March has a packed UN days
I'm a living success and from a Royal Priesthood.

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#3 » by eMade (f) Premium (β40576) » March 24th, 2019, 2:58 pm

AK Horsfall wrote:Some few days ago we had World Down syndrome day, World Happiness day, World Water day and now World Tuberculosis day. I think the month of March has a packed UN days

You are correct. April is loaded too. Stay tuned.
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#4 » by Favour12 (β276) » May 1st, 2019, 5:28 pm

Hmmmm ooo
Flash

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#5 » by eMade (f) Premium (β40576) » May 1st, 2019, 5:46 pm

Favour12 wrote:Hmmmm ooo

What's that mean? :shkd:
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#6 » by AK Horsfall Premium (β35385) » May 1st, 2019, 5:49 pm

eMade wrote:
Favour12 wrote:Hmmmm ooo

What's that mean? :shkd:


:lol; :lol; :lol;
I'm a living success and from a Royal Priesthood.

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#7 » by eMade (f) Premium (β40576) » May 1st, 2019, 6:03 pm

AK Horsfall wrote:
eMade wrote:
Favour12 wrote:Hmmmm ooo

What's that mean? :shkd:


:lol; :lol; :lol;

Seriously. Hmmm is not a useful comment. A meme would be better.

We are waiting for the day if reckoning, #ßCoins redemption.
About βCoins: 61200 ✓ VIP Members: 61848 ✓ Affiliate System: 62508

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#8 » by AK Horsfall Premium (β35385) » May 1st, 2019, 6:20 pm

eMade wrote:
AK Horsfall wrote:
eMade wrote:
Favour12 wrote:Hmmmm ooo

What's that mean? :shkd:


:lol; :lol; :lol;

Seriously. Hmmm is not a useful comment. A meme would be better.

We are waiting for the day if reckoning, #ßCoins redemption.


Really
I'm a living success and from a Royal Priesthood.

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#9 » by Favour12 (β276) » May 3rd, 2019, 8:47 am

AK Horsfall wrote:
eMade wrote:
AK Horsfall wrote:
eMade wrote:
Favour12 wrote:Hmmmm ooo

What's that mean? :shkd:


:lol; :lol; :lol;

Seriously. Hmmm is not a useful comment. A meme would be better.

We are waiting for the day if reckoning, #ßCoins redemption.


Really
sheet
Flash

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